In Word Frames, we ask the kids to draw an image of the topic they are studying. The image should not be from the textbook.  Instead, it should come from their own imagination. Wouldn’t it be better for the kids to memorize the images in their textbook?

To answer this, we first need to think about what school is trying to do.

True or False? School teaches us about life.

We would like to say true, but then if we start to think about some of the random things we were taught, we reach a different conclusion.

We were taught about Romeo and Juliet. I suppose this is a life experience for some.

We were taught about the 9 planets of the solar system. My guess is none of us will even see one of them.

We were taught about writing poetry. Definitely a valuable tool for song-writers, but for the rest of us? Not so sure.

So does school really teach us about life?

In fact, school does not teach us about life, it teaches us about humans in life. It teaches us about… us.

Why learn about the 9 planets? Because a long time ago, some person was adventurous enough to look up at the night sky and figure out they were there.

Why Romeo and Juliet? Because Shakespeare was cynical of real-world family drama.

Why poetry? Because people enjoy expressing their imagination through poetry.

What do all these have in common? School connects us to the human imagination of life.

When school became textbook centered, the imagination aspect was thrown out the window. Take a look at the pages of a science textbook and see some diagram of the planets, your first thought is not of an astronomer gazing in wonder up at the stars.

Word Frames tries to bring back that human imagination into the learning experience. The drawings are not necessarily meant to teach, but to enable each kid to imagine in the same way as those first adventurers imagined the topic of their study.

Word Frames Objectives – The Image the Topic

In Word Frames, we ask the kids to draw an image of the topic they are studying. The image should not be from the textbook from their own imagination. Wouldn’t it be better for the kids to memorize the images in their textbook?

To answer this, we first need to think about what school is trying to do.

True or False? School teaches us about life.

We would like to say true, but then if we start to think about some of the random things we were taught, we reach a different conclusion.

We were taught about Romeo and Juliet. I suppose this is a life experience for some.

We were taught about the 9 planets of the solar system. My guess is none of us will even see one of them.

We were taught about writing poetry. Definitely a valuable tool for song-writers, but for the rest of us? Not so sure.

So does school really teach us about life?

In fact, school does not teach us about life, it teaches us about human imagination in life. It teaches us about… us.

Why learn about the 9 planets? Because a long time ago, some person was adventurous enough to look up at the night sky and figure out they were there.

Why Romeo and Juliet? Because Shakespeare was cynical of real-world family drama.

Why poetry? Because people enjoy expressing their imagination through poetry.

What do all these have in common? School connects us to the human imagination of life.

When school became textbook centered, the imagination aspect was thrown out the window. Take a look at the pages of a science textbook and see some diagram of the planets, your first thought is not of an astronomer gazing in wonder up at the stars.

Word Frames tries to bring back that human imagination into the learning experience. The drawings are not necessarily meant to teach, but to enable each kid to imagine in the same way as those first adventurers imagined the topic of their study.

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